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I have recently came across a demo of for a software that's built on natural language processing and its job is to convert a text the user types on a Python interpreter such as Jupyter and the software automatically converts it to a code. A detailed explanation of this software can be found here.

I was wondering if such software is developed to handle cleaning and manipulating data, then what would be left for data scientist to do? At the moment there is a trend, the democratization of machine learning, or the citizen data scientist. While more and more software integrates machine learning would this be considered a dangerous trend? and how should we accommodate with the rising trend of similar softwares?

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    $\begingroup$ It reminds me of the discussion back in the 70s when people argued that soon no office workers would be required anymore due to the introduction of PCs. Or, similarly, that physicians will become obsolete due to expert systems back in the days. People being scared of being substituted by machines is not a new trend but has always been there. Accordingly, I do not see it as danger but rather the contrary. Increasing proliferation of AI will further increase the need for data scientists and machine learning engineers. In my opinion the argument is based on some sort of tech anxiety. $\endgroup$
    – Sammy
    Aug 23 at 13:32
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I think commitstrip got it spot on. :-)

For myself, I would invest into soft skills, i.e. working with people, decoding what is needed from what is requested, planning large projects, and into hard skills like statistics, information theory and related areas of maths. Coding is just means to get things done IMHO

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