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I'm trying to understand what level of measurement is best for describing the 'number of rooms in a flat' feature.

First of all, I think it's not a continuous feature, because rational values like 1.42, for example, don't make sense.

To decide whether a feature is categorical or nominal, we should try to find an ordering between values. And here is my question: should we look for an order with respect to the response feature (in my case 'Price of a property')?

We can say a '1-room flat' is cheaper than a '2-room flat', and so on. But that is not always the case. In general, maybe it's true, but there are cases when a '1-room flat' in the city centre is way more expensive than the one further away.

So, a can't decide which representation to choose - categorical or nominal.

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    $\begingroup$ Categorical and base the price on constructed m2 and zone. $\endgroup$
    – TKW
    Commented Jun 25, 2017 at 17:09

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I don’t know where you’re getting this particular classification scheme from, (continuous, categorical, nominal), but it’s worth mentioning that this isn’t a great scheme for classifying data types. You’ve already encountered an example of a data type (count data/natural numbers) that doesn’t fit neatly into them.

It is also worth mentioning that a lot of people will use “nominal” and “categorical” interchangeably to describe a discrete data type with no natural ordering. Probably the most widely-accepted term to describe discrete data with a natural ordering is ordinal data.

In this case, "number of rooms in a flat" has an unambiguous ordering. In a very real and intuitive sense, a five-room flat has more rooms than a two-room flat. A one-room flat has fewer rooms than a three-room flat. It makes sense to talk about one flat having a greater or lesser number of rooms than another, and if we want to know if that ordering matters in some way, we need to preserve the ordering in our analysis.

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  • $\begingroup$ According to this article, it seems that the number of rooms in a flat fits better into the "interval" variable type, because consecutive values of the variable are equally spaced by 1. What do you think about this? $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 11, 2023 at 12:28
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I'd stick with continuous.

A number of 1.42 could mean that you may have a single room, but with significantly more area than the average room.

You may even have some fraction if you need to share kitchen and bathroom with others.

Those things may be easier to fit in a number than in yet another category you don't know how to order.

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