5
$\begingroup$

I would like to learn both Python and R for usage in data science projects.

I am currently unemployed, fresh out of university, scouting around for jobs and thought it would be good if I get some Kaggle projects under my profile.

However, I have very little knowledge in either language. Have used Matlab and C/C++ in the past. But I haven't produced production quality code or developed an application or software in either language. It has been dirty coding for academic usage all along.

I have used a little bit of Python, in a university project, but I dont know the fundamentals like what is a package , etc etc. ie havent read the intricacies of the language using a standard Python Textbook etc..

Have done some amount of coding in C/C++ way back (3-4 years back then switched over to Matlab/Octave).

I would like to get started in Python Numpy Scipy scikit-learn and pandas etc. but just reading up Wikipedia articles or Python textbooks is going to be infeasible for me.

And same goes with R, except that I have zero knowledge of R.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

$\endgroup$

closed as primarily opinion-based by Sean Owen Nov 13 '14 at 4:38

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This is probably off topic if you're just asking for tutorials and resources. Please elaborate with the specific issues you are facing with these tools. $\endgroup$ – Sean Owen Oct 21 '14 at 13:59
  • $\begingroup$ Here are some guidelines about posts here. datascience.stackexchange.com/help/dont-ask $\endgroup$ – sheldonkreger Nov 13 '14 at 0:18
2
$\begingroup$

There is an online data science "game" that takes you from learning how to use Python for loading a csv and using scikit to machine learning algorithms such as support vector machines. Here is a blog post with a demo video and the actual site is Explore Data Science. Personally, I think its genius.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Look pretty cool, but also a bit expensive. Anyway I like the idea. $\endgroup$ – Damian Melniczuk Nov 7 '14 at 7:41
1
$\begingroup$

I have found the video tutorial/IPython notebook format really helped me get into the python ecosystem.

There were two tutorials at SciPy 2013 that cover sklearn (part 1 of 1st tutorial, github repo for notebooks).

Similar tutorials, from PyCon2012 and PyData2012, are out there for pandas but I don't have the rep to link searching for pandas tutorial on youtube should allow you to find them.

Since you mention Kaggle, I guess you will have seen their getting started with python tutorial for the titanic passenger dataset (I don't have the rep here to provide a link but searching for Getting Started with Python: Kaggle's Titanic Competition should get you there).

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

There are really so many good resources now. If you want to stay away from textbooks, both O'Reilly Media and Packt Publishing offer much lighter but effective reading on a lot of great topics. These books are much more applied in practice.

As far as learning the languages go, Coursera, Udacity, Code Acadmey, and Code School have great tutorials. I would recommend taking a look at the following:

Coursera AI and Stats Courses https://www.coursera.org/courses?orderby=upcoming&lngs=en&cats=stats,cs-ai

Udacity Data Science courses https://www.udacity.com/courses#!/data-science

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

I can only recommend Advanced R by Hadley Wickham. I think it is at the same time incredibly rich in content and easy to read. You say you have zero knowledge in R, but I believe since you already have programming skills in other languages this book can complement very fruitfully any classical "R beginner manual" (for the latter see here).

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

The Art of R Programming by Normal Matloff is a great way to find your way towards being an R user. I've recommended this book to several people navigating the tutorial / book universe and to my knowledge they've all stuck with it.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

The R Programming Wikibook is a nice collaborative handbook for R.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

If you prefer quick hands-on/interactive tutorials, below are my suggestions -

Python - codeacademy, Google Python Class

R - CodeSchool's 'Try R' and DataCamp (suggested above)

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Also, Green Tea Press offers free books on related topics such as an intro to Python and using python with Probability and Stats. http://www.greenteapress.com/index.html

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

I would recommend those materials:

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.