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For an upcoming project, I'm mining textual posts from an online forum, using Scrapy. What is the best way to store this text data? I'm thinking of simply exporting it into a JSON file, but is there a better format? Or does it not matter?

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    $\begingroup$ I think that the optimal solution depends on various factors, such as the data volume, project's performance requirements and intended types of analysis. $\endgroup$ – Aleksandr Blekh Jan 4 '15 at 5:03
  • $\begingroup$ I'm crawling around 5,000 posts or so, and intend to perform some unsupervised topic modelling on them. $\endgroup$ – cakesofwrath Jan 4 '15 at 13:50
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    $\begingroup$ Based on your comment, I think that the storage method is not very important and may be based on your convenience and/or tools availability. Let's see what other people think. $\endgroup$ – Aleksandr Blekh Jan 4 '15 at 23:41
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    $\begingroup$ This needs more clarification, and does not seem data science specific -- not the scraping and storage part. $\endgroup$ – Sean Owen Jan 5 '15 at 11:28
  • $\begingroup$ I agree with @SeanOwen that this question needs clarification: at least, the OP should include his size, performance and expected use (topic modeling) requirements in the question (taking it from his own comment); and he should make it clear why is this a Data Science question (maybe rephrase the question to: does storage format of textual data matter for later modeling?) $\endgroup$ – logc Jan 8 '15 at 20:14
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In general, use a storage method that allows you to quickly query it. If your collection is huge, you might need something Lucene-based, like ElasticSearch. If you are a SQL crack and your favorite DB supports it, a full-text index might do the trick. For small sizes like the 5000 documents, even Linux' LocateDb+grep or OSX' spotlight could be enough.

The important point is to be able to quickly verify assumptions about the content of your data - how many documents contain X and Y, does any document contain W but not V, etc.

This will be useful at both the whole set level as well as for analyzing your topic clusters. Finally, a few GNU tools or SQL mastery can also help you profile your document sets more efficiently (n-gram counts/ranks, collocations, concordances, etc)

Edit: that means, for the above reasons and given your collection size, good old plain text (in a file system or a database) might be more efficient than any "fancy" format.

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Suppose that a forum post has, on average, 2000 characters, which is more or less the equivalent of a page of text, than the total memory needed is 10MB if text is ASCII. Even if the text is Unicode encoded in an Asian language it will take 40MB.

This is far too little for modern computers, so a simple text format is the best since it can be parsed in the fastest way, and loaded into RAM all at once.

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Let me assume you intend to use Python libraries to analyze the data, since you are using Scrapy to gather the data.

If this is true, then a factor to consider for storage would be compatibility with other Python libraries. Of course, plain text is compatible with anything. But e.g. Pandas has a host of IO tools that simplifies reading from certain formats. If you intend to use scikit-learn for modeling, then Pandas can still read the data in for you, if you then cast it from a DataFrame to a Numpy array as an intermediate step.

These tools allow you to read CSV and JSON, but also HDF5 ... particularly, I would draw your attention to the experimental support for msgpack, which seems to be a binary version of JSON. Binary means here that the stored files will be smaller and therefore faster to read and write. A somewhat similar alternative is BSON, which has a Python implementation — no Pandas or Numpy involved.

Considering these formats only makes sense if you intend to give at least some formatting to the stored text, e.g. storing the post title separately from the post content, or storing all posts in a thread in order, or storing the timestamp ... If you considered JSON at all, then I suppose this is what you intended. If you just intend to store the plain post contents, then use plain text.

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I think one has to be very careful when storing textual data. If they are user comments then, for security concerns it's better if it is encoded in some format before storage. A protobuf object can then be defined to resolve the encoding.

Depending on the query pattern, and accepted latency in retrieval of the data, DB should be decided. Just a recommendation, if the idea is to store comments over a period of time for each user, consider HBase or Cassandra. They are optimized for time range queries.

Recommend read: http://info.mapr.com/rs/mapr/images/Time_Series_Databases.pdf

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  • $\begingroup$ How does time series come into the question? $\endgroup$ – Sean Owen Jan 8 '15 at 14:18
  • $\begingroup$ Well, it depends what one is trying to do with the textual data right. For e.g. I have a use-case where i am tracking how elaborate explanation does a user give when asked the same question by different ppl but over a period of time. $\endgroup$ – Pramit Jan 8 '15 at 23:06

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