0
$\begingroup$

There is no other description about the data, if it is univariate, bivariate, etc. neither the type of distribution is given.

I recently came across this question, I would like to know how skewness affects unaffected data percentage

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ "I recently came across this question" where did you come across it? $\endgroup$ – marco_gorelli Oct 4 '18 at 13:03
  • $\begingroup$ It is an interview question for an internship I applied for. $\endgroup$ – Alwin Aind Oct 4 '18 at 14:15
  • $\begingroup$ Also, looks like user Batman applied for the same internship: datascience.stackexchange.com/questions/39073/… $\endgroup$ – marco_gorelli Oct 4 '18 at 14:35
  • $\begingroup$ You are right @marco_gorelli $\endgroup$ – Alwin Aind Oct 4 '18 at 14:43
0
$\begingroup$

This is not answerable in general. You don't even know the skewness or standard deviation around the median without missing data, so you can't compare those quantities. Without more information about the distribution there is no way to figure out how much data is missing, or where in the distribution the missing data is located.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ So do I make assumptions to answer this question? $\endgroup$ – Alwin Aind Oct 4 '18 at 14:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.