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I wonder why most people now don't use matlab. I guess the reason is matlab is not free, so companies don't want to use it, then interviewees don't use it, then schools don't encourage it, then nobody ends up using it. But I like it, compared to C++, Python, for it's convenient to plot figures without needing to import any libraries or header files, let alone those powerful ODE solvers. I might be wrong on any of the above points, as I'm not most familiar with other languages. Any comments?

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I beg to differ. I've seen a multitude of researchers using MatLab in their respective research initiatives. MatLab, as many will soon point out, is closed source. In addition to its code proprietary legalities, it has a hefty price tag. Almost all educational institutions, in the US for example, that are ranked as "Highest Research Activity" and "Higher Research Activity" universities by Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education will typically have bulk licensing. This means that their professors, masters(thesis), and doctoral students will have MatLab availability(at their request) from their local office of information technology (OIT) in their respective universities(typically the College of Engineering at a university)

At a personal level, you may buy MatLab, but you are likely to migrate to R and Python soon. This unfortunate and monetary painful process is due to the widespread adoption and development of Python libraries and R packages specifically for data science research and analytics.

The short answer after this lengthy response comes down to MatLab's adoption and its upfront cost. With Python and R, you can be learning and producing in a shorted period of time. Plus, it's free.

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Most people are using Python or R for data-science, I like Python more because python have enormous amount of libraries for datascience related tasks (for data-analysis, plotting, out of the box machine-learning & deep learning algorithms) and huge open source community to support/help. You can read more about individual language capabilities everything can be done using any of these languages (Python/R/Matlab) it's just the matter of perspective.

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    $\begingroup$ Matlab has its embedded machine learning toolbox too $\endgroup$
    – feynman
    Nov 8, 2018 at 3:40

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