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Doing research on the internet, I found many scientific papers, ideas, and experiments concerning GANs. But I was unable to find a single example of it being already used commercially.

Q1 can you give examples of companies already using GANs in their product?

Q2 if you're unable to give examples, what's the reason for it? Are GANs too young to be already commercialized? Or maybe companies just have no reason to reveal that they're using this framework to train their AI systems?

PS: I'm aware of some "real world" uses:

  • Some people use it to create fake news, and other nasty things and probably benefit from it.

  • Neural photo editor available on Github

But it's hard to call then "commercial" uses.

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  • $\begingroup$ Something about a painting in an auction sold for an absurd amount of money $\endgroup$ – Alex Feb 2 '19 at 11:12
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I have seen a showcase of a commercial company that used a version of GAN-based super resolution to reconstruct a more detailed image of the seabed out of low resolution depth gauge profiles.

I could imagine that you could use that to visualize a seabed for VR presentations (I'm not sure whether that is done). However I very much doubt the added value over more traditional interpolation, when applied for deciding whether a fairway should be dredged.

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Nvidia has come out with GauGAN, which is assisting artists in making paintings and sketches better and faster and improving their creativity by many folds.

Quote from their website:

NVIDIA’s viral real-time AI art application, GauGAN, Tuesday won two major SIGGRAPH awards.

From amateur doodlers to leading digital artists, creators are coming out in droves to produce masterpieces with GauGAN

GauGAN AI Painting

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Well, yes there are. One of the applications of GANs is image inpainting which is widely used in Photoshop-like applications. You can omit an obstacle that prohibits you to see the entire image and use GANs to see, generate, the original object without any other disturbing objects that may not let you see the desired object entirely.

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