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What do we take into consideration while deciding which technique should be used when dealing with a particular dataset? I understand that there isn't any hard and fast rule to this. Do we use XGBoost only when there are a lot of features in the dataset and RandomForest for otherwise cases? Or are we suppose to hit and trial and find whichever gets us better results everytime?

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Decision Tree is very useful if you want to be able to explain where your result comes from you can often print the tree and see how your model came to this answer.

Random Forest can also provide such information, but you'll have to browse all trees and make some "stats" into them, which is not as easy. But Random Forest often give better results than Decision Tree (except on easy and small datasets).

Finally, XGBoost could give a better result than Random Forest, if well-tuned, but you can't explain it easily. It's also harder to tune, and takes a lot more time to train. If you don't mind about results-explanation, I'd suggest you to try both XGBoost and RandomForest, with a bit on tuning, to see which one is best fitting on your dataset.

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There are quite a few reasons to choose a specific ml algorithm for a given dataset, e.g based on the problem you are trying to solve for example if it is a classification or a regression problem.

Learning about different algorithms and common problems that they are used for and if they are suitable to work under certain conditions e.g XGBoost performing well when the datasets are highly-dimensional, Random forests being easier to tune compared to boosted algorithms like XGBoost, etc

there's no harm in trying out different algorithms and seeing which gives you the best performance but you can, with practice, have some in mind that you can try instead of trying all the algorithms out there.

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