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Yes it is wrong to set shuffle=True. By shuffling the data you allow your model to learn properties of the data distribution that might appear only in the test time periods. For example, if you have a trend in the data, shuffling will 'help' you handle it. In a real-time scenario, you'll never have access to those properties of the distribution.


2

I don't see why not- it's the loss you wish to minimize. I'm using the following as my loss function and it works well when sMAPE is my metric for prediction accuracy. import tensorflow.keras.backend as K def smape_loss(y_true, y_pred): epsilon = 0.1 summ = K.maximum(K.abs(y_true) + K.abs(y_pred) + epsilon, 0.5 + epsilon) smape = K.abs(y_pred - ...


1

In my opinion, I would treat each signal on its own. The approach also depends on the signals and on your definition of anomalies/outliers (for example unexpected long peaks?). But I can point some methods that you can try if they work on your signals: If your signal is normally distributed (or very close to normal distribution) you can remove points (or ...


1

I don't think you can compress time series because there is a risk of losing valuable data. Rather than that, you can set a the max size as the default size, and set zeros to the left for smaller data. If the sampling is too high (ex: milli seconds), do not hesitate to reduce it for all data (ex: seconds) taking the average values, as long as the prediction ...


1

You need to include all competitions for a simple reason: you'll not have enough data if you do not. (Keep in mind that ML models generelly need large datasets while you only have a couple of matches for a given team in a given year in a given competition if it is not the national league) In their paper Learning to predict soccer results from relational data ...


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